The Carl Van Vechten Gallery

The Carl Van Vechten GalleryHoused in a late 19th century Victorian building, The Carl Van Vechten Gallery was established in 1949, when the acclaimed American painter Georgia O'Keeffe donated to Fisk the extraordinary group of works that form The Alfred Stieglitz Collection.

The collection was given in honor of O'Keeffe's husband, Alfred Stieglitz, the pioneering American photographer and art impresario. The gallery was named in honor of Carl Van Vechten, an American novelist, critic, photographer and philanthropist, who played an important role in securing The Stieglitz Collection for Fisk.

The Carl Van Vechten Gallery houses a changing schedule of traveling exhibitions and temporary installations from Fisk University's permanent art collections. Every two years, the gallery features The Alfred Stieglitz Collection of Modern American and European Art, which includes works by Pablo Picasso, Paul Cezanne, Auguste-Pierre Renoir, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Georgia O’Keeffe, Charles Demuth, Marsden Hartley, and Arthur Dove. 

You may view the list of works in The Stieglitz Collection by downloading the attached pdf .

Current Exhibitions


AFRICAN-AMERICAN AUTOMOBILITY: THE DANGEROUS FREEDOM OF THE OPEN ROAD

AFRICAN-AMERICAN AUTOMOBILITY: THE DANGEROUS FREEDOM OF THE OPEN ROAD

April 12, 2018–September 15, 2018
Carl Van Vechten Gallery, Fisk University

African-American Automobility: The Dangerous Freedom of the Open Road is a solo exhibition of works by Jonathan Calm. Jonathan Calm is a visual artist and assistant professor in Photography at the Department of Art & Art History at Stanford University. His interests include urban architecture and housing, and he is currently developing new work around the representation of African-American automobility, featuring performance, reenactment and portraiture to evoke the tension between moving and still images and bodies.

For this exhibit, Jonathan Calm has created large murals of black-and-white photographs that capture both urban and rural landscapes in different areas of the country. These images provide a backdrop from which performers emerge at regular intervals to act out and deliver monologues relating to the origin of the photographs. Through their performance, they transform the pictures into historical documents that literally “come alive” and become oral history— highlighting how history can be performed at will. 45 images—grouped in grids of nine— memorialize a small selection of individuals of color who lost their lives when stopped for “driving while black” by depicting the locations where they were “targeted.” Reaching back to the Rodney King beating in the early 1990s, Calm seeks to pay sobering homage to the more and less known names claimed by an ongoing cycle of victimization that provokes newsworthy outrage one moment and recedes into mainstream media oblivion the next. Through a series of self-portraits, he contemplates his own experience in the space constituted by the dangerous freedom of the open road.

Above image credit: Jonathan Calm. Lorraine Motel I, 2017. All works copyright the artist, courtesy Rena Bransten Gallery Silver gelatin; dimensions variable. © Jonathan Calm.

African-American Automobility: The Dangerous Freedom of the Open Road is in collaboration with Stanford Art Gallery.


Permanent Installations

Aaron Douglas: Symbolic Negro History Murals
   Cravath Hall, 2nd Floor  

From A Master's Hand: Winold Reiss Portraits
   John Hope & Aurelia Franklin Library, 1st Floor 

An Extraordinary Gift: The James Miles Collection
   Appleton Room, Jubilee Hall, 1st Floor

Location

On the corner of Dr. D.B. Todd Jr. Blvd. and Jackson Street
Fisk University Campus
1000 17th Ave North
Nashville, TN 37208
615.329.8720

New Hours

Monday-Saturday 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

* Closed University Holidays