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 Linda T. Wynn, B.S.  M.S., M.P.A.

About

Linda T. Wynn  earned her B.S. and M. S. degrees in history and a Masters in Public Administration from Tennessee State University.  In addition to serving on the Fisk University faculty in the Department of History and Political Science, she has also lectured at Tennessee State, Middle Tennessee State, Austin Peay State Universities, Dyer State Community College, and Lipscomb University. Mrs. Wynn has served as a manuscript advisor to the University Press of Florida and  is an active researcher and prolific writer. She has published over 150 articles and numerous book chapters in various publications.   She was one of the major contributors to the Tennessee Historical Society’s, Tennessee Encyclopedia of Culture and History. A contributor to the Tennessee Historical Quarterly as an author and a book reviewer, Mrs. Wynn has served as a consultant to the Tennessee Departments of Education and Tourism, the Secretary of State Office, and the Tennessee Human Rights Commission on issues relating to the culture and history of African Americans in Tennessee. The author of the chapter on “Civil Rights” in the 8th ,9th, 10th  and  11th  editions African-American Almanac published by the Gale Publishing Group,  She is a contributor to Macmillan’s African-American Encyclopedia; and the Tennessee Arts Commission and Tennessee Historical Society’s Creating Traditions, Expanding Horizons: 200 Years of the Arts in Tennessee.

She team-taught a course, which she helped to design on the Civil Rights Movement in Nashville, The Beloved Community: Then and Now. This course was a collaboration course among American Baptist College, Fisk University’s Department of History, and David Lipscomb University’s Department of History, Political Science and Religion. It has been said Wynn’s forthcoming chapter publication “Beyond Patriarchy: The Meaning of Martin Luther King, Jr. for Women of the World,” in A Single Garment of Destiny by Paul Dekar and Lewis V. Baldwin is “really groundbreaking in that it explores King’s meaning and relevance for women in a global context. No scholar, male or female, has seriously taken this approach up to this point.”

A sought after speaker on topics that relate to African American, Civil Rights and Women’s history, Mrs. Wynn has spoken to numerous groups across the state of Tennessee. She is a member of the Tennessee Historical Society, the Southern Historical Association, American Association of Historians, the Association of Social and Behavioral Scientist.  She is a member of the advisory board and serves as scholar for the Promise Land Community Club National Endowment for the Humanities project Created Equal: The American Civil Rights Struggle and is a member of the advisory board for Lipscomb University’s Department of History, Political Science, and Religion Civil War Project.  She served on the African American Preservation Alliance Board. A founder and Co-Chair of the award-winning Local Conference on African American Culture and History, she serves on boards of the Spruce Street Baptist Church Community Development Corporation, the Spruce Street Baptist Church Golden Manor, Metro Historical Commission, and is a member of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc.

Research Interests

African American History
African Americans in Tennessee History
The African American Freedom Struggle and Civil Rights History
African American Women’s History
Women’s History

Publications

In addition to co-editing Freedom Facts and First: 400 Years of the African American Civil Rights Experience with Dr. Jessie Carney Smith, she co-edited Profiles of African Americans in Tennessee with Dr. Bobby L. Lovett and was one of the major contributors to the Tennessee Encyclopedia of Culture and History. Mrs. Wynn has also been a contributor to the African American National Biography, Henry Louis Gates and Evelyn Higginbotham, eds., the Encyclopedia of African American Popular Culture, and the Encyclopedia of African American Education. Her chapter “Toward a More Perfect Democracy: The Struggle of African Americans in Fayette to Fulfill the Unfulfilled Right of Franchise,” appeared in The History of African Americans in Tennessee: Trials and Triumphs, published by the University of Tennessee Press and edited by Dr. C. Van West.  Mrs. Wynn is the editor of Journey to Our Past: A Guide to African-American Markers in Tennessee.  She also served as a consultant and contributor to the Encyclopedia of African American Business and Notable Black American Men, Book II, edited by Dr. Jessie C. Smith. The author of the African American Almanac’s chapter on “Civil Rights,” she contributed a chapter on Diane Nash entitled “Diane Judith Nash: A Mission for Equality, Justice and Social Change” to Tennessee Women: Their Lives and Times, edited by Sarah L. Wilkerson Freeman and Beverly G. Bond and published by the University of Georgia Press. Professor Wynn also wrote “African Americans in Tennessee History,” which appeared in Black America: A State by State Encyclopedia, edited by Alton Hornsby and published by Greenwood Press. A book review contributor to the Tennessee Historical Quarterly, she has a chapter entitled  “Beyond Patriarchy: The Meaning of Martin Luther King, Jr. for the Women of the World” in the forthcoming book Caught in an Inescapable Network of Mutuality edited by  Lewis V. Baldwin and Paul Dekar, editors.

Linda T. Wynn, M.S., M. P. A.
Lecturer

Education                         
B.S. History/Tennessee State University
M. S. History/Tennessee State University
M. P. A/ Public Administration/ Tennessee State University

Contact
Park Johnson 228
1000 17th Avenue, North

615.329.8529