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Course Descriptions

CHEM 103, EXPERIMENTS IN GENERAL CHEMISTRY I, 1 credit
This course provides a review of chemical concepts, mathematical operations, and laboratory exercises to accompany General Chemistry. Exercises will illustrate the determination of empirical formulas, limiting reactants, spectroscopy, inorganic nomenclature, titrations and other topics covered in general chemistry I. Students should enroll concurrently in CHEM 113.

CHEM 104, EXPERIMENTS IN GENERAL CHEMISTRY II, 1 credit
A continuation of CHEM 103. Exercises will illustrate pH and buffers, acid-base reactions, kinetics, molar mass determinations, electrochemistry, inorganic chemical principles, and other topics covered in general chemistry II. Students should enroll concurrently in CHEM 114. Prerequisite: CHEM 113 and 103.

CHEM 113, GENERAL CHEMISTRY I, 3 credits
Fundamental principles of chemistry, including atomic theory, molecular concepts, stoichiometry, gas laws and elementary thermo-chemistry. This course requires a good background in mathematics. Students should enroll concurrently in CHEM 103 laboratory.

CHEM 114, GENERAL CHEMISTRY II, 3 credits
Topics that will be covered include: chemistry of some elementary inorganic and organic substances, equilibria principles, solution chemistry, acid-base theories, pH, buffers, principles of kinetics and electrochemistry. Prerequisite: CHEM 113, 103. Students should enroll in CHEM 104 concurrently with CHEM 114.

CHEM 203, EXPERIMENTS IN ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I, 1 credit
Experiments in organic laboratory techniques such as distillation, extraction, recrystallization, and chromatography. Preparation of representative organic compounds will be accomplished. Students should enroll concurrently in CHEM 233.

CHEM 204, EXPERIMENTAL ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II, 1 credit
Laboratory  experiments will include  multi-step preparation of compounds utilizing a variety of reactions including oxidation, reduction, Friedel-Crafts, Grignard, and Diels-Alder.  Chromatographic and spectrometric analysis will be utilized.  Designed for non-majors in chemistry. Prerequisite: CHEM 203 and 233. Students should enroll concurrently in CHEM 234.

CHEM 206, EXPERIMENTS IN ORGANIC AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY, 2 credits
Laboratory experiments will include multi-step preparations of compounds utilizing multiple types of reactions including oxidation, reduction, Friedel- Crafts, Grignard, and Diels-Alder reactions. There is frequent utilization of chromatographic separations and spectrometric methods of analysis. Volumetric and gravimetric methods are utilized for quantitative analysis of unknown samples for such ions as chloride, sulfate, and oxalate.   Concepts of error analysis and data treatment in chemical analysis are  presented.  This course is primarily for chemistry majors, who take this course in lieu of CHEM 204, concurrently with CHEM 234. Prerequisites: CHEM 233 and 203.

CHEM 233, ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I, 3 credits
A systematic study of the compounds of carbon, Emphasis is on basic principles of bonding, structure, and functional groups Also included will be mechanisms of such reactions as nucleophilic substitutions and eliminations as well as electrophilic addition to alkenes and alkynes. Study of structural, geometric and optical isomerism, as well as principles of spectroscopy.

CHEM 234, ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II, 3 credits
This course is a continuation of CHEM 233. Topics include the chemistry of aromatic compounds: properties, reactions, and mechanisms. Also included are detailed studies of the chemistry of functional groups: their preparation, reactions and mechanisms. Other topics may include introductions to polymers, carbohydrates, amino acids, and other biomolecules. Prerequisites: CHEM 233 and 203. Students should enroll concurrently in either CHEM 204 or 206.

CHEM 316, INORGANIC CHEMISTRY, 4 credits
Three hours of lecture and four hours of laboratory work each week. Recent theoretical advances and laboratory exercises are utilized to discuss topics, which include inorganic synthesis, bonding, spectra, stereochemistry, reactivity and descriptive chemistry of inorganic compounds of the main group and the transition elements. Prerequisite: CHEM 342.

CHEM 341, PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY I and LAB I, 4 credits
Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory work each week. This course offers a formal introduction to equilibrium thermodynamics and its application to a number of problems that are of interest in chemistry. Examples include the (systematic) study of thermo-chemistry, phase changes, and "real" physicochemical systems. Prerequisites: CHEM 114, MATH 120.

CHEM 342, PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY II and LAB II, 4 credits
Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory work each week. A continuation of CHEM 341, this course emphasizes solutions chemistry. The Gibbs chemical potential is the basis for most discussions. Some attention is given to time dependent properties such as diffusion, viscosity of gases and macromolecular systems, the kinetics of chemical reactions and quantum mechanics.

CHEM 355-356, SENIOR RESEARCH, 3 credits each semester
Permits the student to conduct a minor research project, including the literature search, planning laboratory work, writing up the work in the form of an honors thesis, and presenting the work at Student Research Day or a regional/national meeting. Junior or Senior status recommended. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

CHEM 450, CHEMICAL LITERATURE, 1 credit
Study of the structure and use of chemical literature.

CHEM 457, HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY OF CHEMISTRY, 1 credit
Seminar and reading course for advanced students.

CHEM 470, ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY, 4 credits
Two hours of lecture and five hours of laboratory. Offers integrated lecture and laboratory instruction in theory and applications of complex acid-base, precipitation, redox, and complexometric equillibria and titrations. Provides instruction in theory and instrumental laboratory applications of potentiometric, coulometric, chromatographic and spectroscopic analysis.

CHEM 501-502, One half credit each semester
Required of all senior and graduate chemistry majors. This is a capstone course for the chemistry curriculum. Weekly  technical presentations and discussion of various  chemical topics by faculty, students and invited guests.  Student presentations are graded using  an established rubric.   Succesful completion of course for seniors requires satisfactory  performance on national standardized major field test in chemistry.

CHEM 582 ( 582 A-D)  - Special Topics

Based on student interest, courses in Special Topics have included:

  • Computational chemistry
  • Biofuels
  • Pharmacology: The chemistry and mechanism of drug action ( 582D) 
  • Polymer chemistry
  • Environmental Chemistry