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Course Descriptions

BIOL 101, GENERAL BIOLOGY I, 3 credits--lecture
This is the beginning introductory course for biology majors. Topics discussed include the chemistry of life, structure and function of the cell, biochemical pathways, cellular reproduction, and Mendelian genetics. Students are introduced to animal form and function, nutrition, circulation, respiration, reproduction and development, neural transmission and chemical signals, and ecology.

BIOL 101L, GENERAL BIOLOGY I LABORATORY, 1 credit
Experiments and other activities are conducted to develop proficiency in use of metric values, preparation of solutions, isolation and identification of organic molecules of living systems. Cell structure and function, including cellular reproduction and other metabolic processes, are studied. Basic aspects of anatomy and physiology of vertebrates are introduced.

BIOL 102, GENERAL BIOLOGY II, 3 credits--lecture
This course is a continuation of BIOL101. Topics to be considered are the molecular basis of inheritance; protein synthesis; origin and evolution of life forms; and structure, function and reproduction of prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Studies will also include anatomy and physiology, reproduction, development, nutrition, control systems and evolution of selected invertebrate and plant life forms. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in BIOL101 and 101L.

BIOL 102L, GENERAL BIOLOGY II LABORATORY, 1 credit
Laboratory exercises will focus on the anatomy and physiology of prokaryotes, protists and fungi; the development, physiology, microscopic and gross anatomy of plants; and the development, anatomy and physiology of invertebrates. Molecular biology techniques are introduced which may be used by students in the conduct of individual or small group research projects to address basic problems in the life sciences. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in BIOL101 and 101L.

BIOL 221,  HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I, 3 credits--lecture
This course will include the interrelationship between structure and function of the body regions. Basic concepts in cell physiology, histology and gross anatomical terminology related to structure and function of the skeletal, muscular and integumentary systems will be included during the first half of this two-semester course. Clinical applications and case study methods will be used to reinforce these concepts. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in BIOL101, 101L or permission of the instructor.

BIOL 221L HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY LABORATORY I, 1 credit
This course is designed to stimulate interest, strengthen concepts addressed in lecture and provide students with laboratory skills. The structure and function of cells, histology, gross examination of bones, and dissection and identification of individual muscles will be completed during this semester. Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in BIOL101, 101L or permission of the instructor.

BIOL 222, HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II, 3 credits
This course will include studies of the structure and function of the digestive, cardiovascular, respiratory, lymphatic and immune, urinary, reproductive, nervous and endocrine systems of the human. Clinical applications will be used to reinforce the concepts considered. Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in BIOL 221, 221L or permission of the instructor.

BIOL 222L, HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY LABORATORY II, 1 credit
The laboratory  focus will include dissections and identification of structures of the systems studied in BIOL 222. Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in BIOL 221, 221L or permission of the instructor.

BIOL 270, MICROBIOLOGY, 3 credits--lecture
This course is designed to assist students as they seek to understand the relevance of microorganisms in human and plant symbiotic relationships--in disease progression and in industrial/environmental applications. Among the topics included are microbiological techniques, microbial replication, metabolism, growth, and proposed therapeutic treatment of diseases caused by microbes. Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in BIOL101, 101L; CHEM 203, 233 or concurrent enrollment in the latter/permission of the instructor.

BIOL 270L, MICROBIOLOGY LABORATORY, 1 credit
Laboratory exercises will reinforce concepts introduced in BIOL 270. Co-requisite: enrollment in BIOL 270.

BIOL 313, MOLECULAR PLANT BIOLOGY, 3  credits—lecture
This course covers general principles, emphasizing morphological, molecular and physiological functions of cells and their development in higher plants. Multimedia technology is integrated throughout the lecture and laboratory curriculum. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in BIOL 102, 102L; CHEM 234, 204.

BIOL 313L, EXPERIMENTS IN MOLECULAR PLANT BIOLOGY, 1 credit--lab
The laboratory is designed to involve students in investigation, problem solving, and discovery. Students will work in small groups with computer simulation programs and other activities involving plants. Experiments using molecular biology techniques will allow studies in plant genetics; physiology and histology will be covered. Computer exercises allow students to investigate molecular techniques, principles of genetics, classification of organisms based on evolutionary relationships, evolutionary mechanisms, population ecology and other topics. Concurrent enrollment in BIOL 313 is required.

BIOL 350, 350L, GENETIC PRINCIPLES, (formerly BIOL 305, 305L) 3credits--lecture and 1 credit lab.
Fundamental principles of heredity and variation are presented. Consideration is given to topics in Mendelian and other classical genetic principles. The post-Mendelian era will include topics on transformation, transduction, and nucleic acid replication structure and function. Laboratory exercises will reinforce the principles presented. Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in  BIOL101, 101L, CHEM 203, 233 or concurrent enrollment in the latter/permission of the instructor.

BIOL 356, 356L, ESSENTIAL DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY
How single cells evolve to complex tissues and organ systems throughout the animal kingdom Prerequisites: Biology111 and either BIOL 360 or BIOL 410

BIOL 360, 360L, MOLECULAR CELL BIOLOGY (formerly BIOL 343, 343L, 344, 344L) 3 credits--lecture and 1 credit lab
This course serves to unify the once separate fields of biochemistry, genetics, cell biology, and physiology. The laboratory experiments will highlight principles of cell organization, the dynamics of cellular processes, membrane compartmentalization and trafficking, and cellular signaling and replication. Prerequisite: BIOL 350 and 350L.

BIOL 390, SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN BIOLOGY, 4 credits
Open to junior and senior majors who are judged to be able to conduct independent study with minimal supervision and who are not seeking honors credit. Prerequisite: Identification of a preceptor and permission of the Discipline Coordinator

BIOL 390H, SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN BIOLOGY, 4 credits
This is an honors course open to junior and senior majors with a cumulative average in science courses of 3.0 or better. Prerequisite: Identification of a preceptor and permission of the Discipline Coordinator

BIOL 410, 410L  EXPERIMENTAL MOLECULAR BIOLOGY and RECOMBINANT  DNA ,  3 credits--lecture and 1 Credit Lab
Principles, methodology, and operation of instruments used in biotechnology are covered. Topics include biocatalysis, fermentation technology, genetic engineering, and immunology. This course emphasizes the value of critical thinking and analytical reasoning required for careers in biological and related areas. Prerequisites: BIOL 313, 313L or NSCI 361, 361L, or permission of instructor.

BIOL 420, 420L. INTRODUCTION TO NEUROBIOLOGICAL SYSTEMS: 3 Credits Lecture  and 1 Credit Lab
Introduction to electrical signaling and synaptic transmission in the central and peripheral nervous system, overview of neuroanatomy, and exploration of the systems for perception of pain, movement, and vision. Fall 

BIOL 450, 450L, Brain, Behavior, and Neuropharmacology,  3 Credits Lecture  and 1 Credit Lab
This course examines the structure and anatomical organization of the central nervous system, the diseases and conditions that arise when the brain is altered, and the methods and drugs used to treat them.

BIOL 497-498, SENIOR SEMINAR, 1 credit each semester
The primary objectives of the course are to increase the student's understanding of interrelations of scientific principles through oral and written presentations. Students are required to conduct library research on an approved topic. Prerequisite: senior status with expectations of receiving the B.A. degree within 1-3 semesters.